Saturday, August 10, 2019

Order your Akademy t-shirt *NOW*

If you want an Akademy 2019 t-shirt you have until Monday 12th Aug at 1100CEST (i.e. in 2 days and a bit) to order it.

Head over to https://akademy.kde.org/2019/akademy-2019-t-shirt and get yourself one of the exclusive t-shirts with Jen's awesome design :)

Sunday, July 28, 2019

My KDE Onboarding Sprint 2019 report

This week I took part on the KDE Onboarding Sprint 2019 (part of what's been known as Nuremberg Megasprint (i.e. KDEConnect+KWin+Onboarding) in, you guessed it, Nuremberg.

The goal of the sprint was "how do we make it easier for people to start contributing". We mostly focused on the "start contributing *code*" side, though we briefly touched artists and translators too.

This is *my* summary, a more official one will appear somewhere else, so don't get annoyed at me if the blog is a bit opinionated (though i'll try it not to)

The main issues we've identified when trying to contribute to KDE software is:
* Getting dependencies is [sometimes] hard
* Actually running the software is [sometimes] hard

Dependencies are hard

Say you want to build dolphin from the git master branch. For that (at the time of writing) you need KDE Frameworks 5.57, this means that if you run the latest Ubuntu or the latest OpenSUSE you can't build it because they ship older versions.

Our current answer for that is kdesrc-build but it's not the most easy to use script, and sometimes you may end up building QtWebEngine or QtWebKit, which as a newbie is something you most likely don't want to do.

Running is hard

Running the software you have just built (once you've passed the dependencies problem) is not trivial either.

Most of our software can't be run uninstalled (KDE Frameworks are a notable exception here, but newbies rarely start developing KDE Frameworks).

This means that you may try to run make install, which if you didn't pass -DCMAKE_INSTALL_PREFIX pointing somewhere in your home you'll probably have to run make install as root since it defaults to /usr/local (this will be fixed in next extra-cmake-modules release to point to a somewhat better prefix) that isn't that useful either since none of your software is looking for stuff in /usr/local. Newbies may be tempted to use -DCMAKE_INSTALL_PREFIX=/usr but that's *VERY* dangerous since it can easily mess up your own system.

For applications, our typical answer is use -DCMAKE_INSTALL_PREFIX=/home/something/else at cmake stage, run make install and then set the environment variables to pick up things from /home/something/else, a newbie will say "which variables" at this stage probably (and not newbies too, I don't think i remember them all). To help with that we generate a prefix.sh in the build dir and after the next extra-cmake-release we will tell the users that they need to run it for things to work.

But still that's quite convoluted and I know from experience answering people in IRC that lots of people get stuck there. It's also very IDE unfriendly since IDEs don't usually have the "install" concept, it's run & build for them.

Solutions

We ended up focusing on two possible solutions:

* Conan: Conan "the C/C++ Package Manager for Developers" (or so they say) is something like pip in the python world but for C/C++. The idea is that by using Conan to get the dependencies we will solve most of the problems in that area. Whether it can help or not with the running side is still unclear, but some of our people involved in the Conan effort think they may either be able to come up with a solution or get the Conan devs to help us with it. Note Conan is not my speciality by far, so this may not be totally correct.

* Flatpak: Flatpak is "a next-generation technology for building and distributing desktop applications on Linux" (or so they say). The benefits of using flatpak are multiple, but focusing on onboarding are. "Getting dependencies is solved", dependencies are either part of the flatpatk SDK and you have them or the flatpak manifest for the application says how to get and build them and that will automagically work for you as it works for everyone else using the same manifest. "Running is solved" because when you build a flatpak it gets built into a self contained artifact so running it is just running it, no installing or environment variable fiddling is needed. We also have [preliminary] support in KDevelop (or you can use Gnome Builder if you want a more flatpak-centric experience for now). The main problem we have with flatpak at this point is that most of our apps are not totally flatpak-ready (e.g. Okular can't print). But that's something we need to fix anyway so it shouldn't be counted as a problem (IMHO).

Summary

*Personally* i think Flatpak is the way to go here, but that means that collectively we need to say "Let's do it", it's something we all have to take into account and thus we have to streamline the manifest handling/updating, focus on fixing the Flatpak related issues that our software may have, etc.

Thanks

I would like to thank SUSE for hosting us in their offices and the KDE e.V. for sponsoring my attendance to the sprint, please donate to KDE if you think the work done at sprints is important.

Monday, July 15, 2019

KDE Applications 19.08 branches created

Make sure you commit anything you want to end up in the KDE Applications 19.08 release to them

We're already past the dependency freeze.

The Freeze and Beta is this Thursday 18 of July.

More interesting dates
August 1, 2019: KDE Applications 19.08 RC (19.07.90) Tagging and Release
August 8, 2019: KDE Applications 19.08 Tagging
August 15, 2019: KDE Applications 19.08 Release

https://community.kde.org/Schedules/Applications/19.08_Release_Schedule

Wednesday, July 10, 2019

Beware of some of the Qt 5.13 deprecation porting hints

QComboBox::currentIndexChanged(QString) used to have (i.e. in Qt 5.13.0) a deprecation warning that said "Use currentTextChanged() instead".

That has recently been reverted since both are not totally equivalent, sure, you can probably "port" from one to the other, but the "use" wording to me seems like a "this is the same" and they are not.

Another one of those is QPainter::initFrom, which inits a painter with the pen, background and font to the same as the given widget. This is deprecated, because it's probably wrong ("what is the pen of a widget?") but the deprecation warning says "Use begin(QPaintDevice*)" but again if you look at the implementation, they don't really do the same. Still need to find time to complain to the Qt developers and get it fixed.

Anyhow, as usual, when porting make sure you do a correct port and not just blind changes.

Tuesday, July 02, 2019

Usability & Productivity Sprint 2019

I [partially, only 2 days out of the 7] attended the Usability & Productivity Sprint 2019 in Valencia two weekends ago.

I was very happy to meet quite some new developer blood, which is something we had been struggling a bit to get lately, so we're starting to get on the right track again :) And I can only imagine it'll get better and better due to the "Onboarding" goal :)

During the sprint we had an interesting discussion about how to get more people to know about usability, and the outcome is that probably we'll try to get some training to members of KDE to increase the knowledge of usability amongst us. Sounds like a good idea to me :)

On the more "what did *you* actually do" side:
* worked on fixing a crash i had on the touchpad kded, (already available on the latest released Plasma!)
* finished part of the implementation for Optional Content Group Links support in Okular (i started that 3 years ago and i was almost sure i had done all the work, but i clearly had not)
* Did some code reviews on existing okular phabricator merge requests (so sad i'm still behind though, we need more people reviewing there other than me)
* Together with Nicolas Fella worked on allowing extra fields from json files to be translated, we even documented it!
* Changed lots of applications released on KDE Applications to follow the KDE Applications versioning scheme, the "winner" was kmag, that had been stuck in version 1.0 for 15 years (and had more than 440 commits since then)
* Fixed a small issue with i18n in kanagram

I would like to thank SLIMBOOK for hosting us in their offices (and providing a shuttle from them to the hotel) and the KDE e.V. for sponsoring my attendance to the sprint, please donate to KDE if you think the work done at sprints is important.

Thursday, June 27, 2019

KDE Applications 19.08 Schedule finalized

It is available at the usual place https://community.kde.org/Schedules/Applications/19.08_Release_Schedule

Dependency freeze is two weeks (July 11) and Feature Freeze a week after that, make sure you start finishing your stuff!


P.S: Remember last day to apply for Akademy Travel Support is this Sunday 30 of June!

Saturday, June 08, 2019

I'm going to Akademy!

And you should too!

Akademy is free to attend however you need to register to reserve your space, so head to https://akademy.kde.org/2019/register and press the buttons.

Akademy is very important to meet people, discuss future plans, learn about new stuff and make friends for life!

Note this year the recommended accomodations are a bit on the expensive side, so you may want to hurry and apply for Travel support. The last round is open until July 1st.


I'm going to Akademy 2019